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Eat Like No Other – Island Hopping // Cheung Chau

Eat Like No Other – Island Hopping // Cheung Chau

Hong Kong is built up of different islands close by, or linked together by tunnels and bridges, such as Hong Kong Island and Lantau, which we visit in our daily lives sometimes without realising it’s an island!

But there are other, more secluded islands, which can only be accessed by a ferry or boat. These islands are the perfect place to explore some of the untouched nature and history of Hong Kong.

Here is Part 1: Cheung Chau Island.

Cheung Chau

As one of the biggest islands away from the city, Cheung Chau is a lively island with many different things to offer. It has a big centre with lots of restaurants and shops lining the seafront, so you can wander around without the distraction of skyscrapers or road crossings.

Cheung Chau

Cheung Chau

If you want to have a bit more of an adventure, there are walks around the island and along the waterfront, which offer breath-taking views, especially on a clear day as you see the city in the distance. There are natural beaches and rocky shores for if you want to relax and watch the waves. One of the walks you can take is the “Mini Great Wall” where you follow a path around the seafront with, a tiny version of the great wall acting as a bannister.

Cheung Chau

Cheung Po Tsai Cave, also known as The Pirate’s Cave is hidden amongst the rocks on the island, which you can go inside and walk through. This dates back to the 18th century when Cheung Po Tsai, a pirate, would use the cave to stash stolen goods from ships. Although the cave is empty now it’s still a thrill to climb down into the darkness and imagine being surrounded by treasures.

What to eat:

Cheung Chau

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Cheung Chau is famous for its annual bun festival, which begins on the Buddha’s birthday and continues throughout the week [April 30th – May 4th 2017]. The festivities take place at the oldest temple on the island, Pak Tai Temple and includes lion dancing, parades and the famous “bun scrambling” contest. The contest is held at midnight on the final day and consists of 60ft bun towers, which are built especially for the occasion and contestants must climb up the tower and collect as many buns as they can.

But if you are not around for the festival, you can try out these savoury buns in local bakeries around the island as well as cold fruit buns that contain real fruit pieces such as mango and strawberry.

Cheung Chau

Cheung Chau

Since there are many restaurants on the island, you can have a choice or where and what to eat, although many offer a similar menu of Chinese cuisine such as fried rice, sweet and sour pork and lots of fresh seafood. With almost all having outdoor seating you can take advantage of the waterfront view and sea breeze. We chose So Bor Kee Resturant, which had a prime location away from the crowds but still in walking distance from the pier.

Cheung Chau

Stay tuned to my adventures in Lamma Island!

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nicole slater
Nicole Slater |
Lifestyle Blogger

Blogger, writer and recent graduate from journalism, Nicole loves to travel the world, spend time with her friends and enjoy the fine things in life.

You can find Nicole´s blog at http://thathongkonggirl.blogspot.com/

Article Written By audrey

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