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How does an Olympic diet look like? Dietitian Sally Shi-Po POON answers.

How does an Olympic diet look like? Dietitian Sally Shi-Po POON answers.

The Olympic games in Rio just started and every sports enthusiast is feeling the Olympic vibe.

We started with our panda games quiz last Friday and today we interviewed Sally Shi-Po POON, dietitian, to ask her some questions regarding sports, food and nutrition.

1.How would you define the eating culture in Hong Kong?

S.P. Characteristics of modern eating culture in Hong Kong can be summed up as the following:

  • Frequent dining out which can lead to the increase of high fat high sodium in the diet.
  • Too much meat protein and inadequate in whole grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Too much sugary beverages and junks.

2. Do you think the traditional Hong Kong diet is suitable for sport activities?

S.P. Traditional Chinese diet is suitable for sports because it should be rich in carbohydrates, and moderate in protein and fat.

3. A vegetarian diet vs a non-vegetarian diet can have different impact on the athlete performance?

S.P.  As long as vegetarian diet is thoroughly planned and nutritionally balanced, it shouldn’t have different impact on the sports performance.

4. What time and what is it better to eat before and after sports?

S.P.  Before sports: Generally most people can tolerate their last main meal 2-4 hours before exercise without any unwanted stomach upset. You can also consider to add in a snack  1-2 hours before exercise for a final top up of fuel stores. In general, pre-exercise meal or snack should be:

  • rich in quality carbohydrate to replenish muscle fuel stores
  • Contain some lean protein to promote muscle repair
  • Include a source of fluid and electrolytes to rehydrate effectively
Examples:
  • Small bowl cereal with chopped fruit and yoghurt
  • Fruit smoothie
  • Bread with sliced banana and honey

After sports:

Rehydrating should begin soon after sports. The body is most effective at replacing carbohydrate and promoting muscle repair and growth in the first ~60-90min after exercise, however this will continue to occur for another ~12-24 hours. In general foods should:
  • Be rich in quality carbohydrate to replenish muscle fuel stores
  • Contain some lean protein to promote muscle repair
  • Include a source of fluid and electrolytes to rehydrate effectively

Examples:

  • Tuna salad sandwich
  • Bowl of cereal with yoghurt and berries
  • fresh chopped fruits with Greek yoghurt
  • Spaghetti bolognese (lean beef)

foodpanda magazine kindly thanks dietitian Sally Shi-Po POON

Registered dietitian (UK)
Founder of Personal Dietitian
Facebook: Sally Poon Registered Dietitian

Article Written By dpettenuzzo

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